All posts by fineeyewear

I’ll Be Back!

For those that remember the iconic look that Linda Hamilton rocked as Sarah Connor in Terminator 2, you will be thrilled to know that the creator, Matsuda Eyewear, has reintroduced this magnificent piece of art in a limited edition celebration.

The Futuristic and Classic look brought to the forefront of fashion by Matsuda Eyewear
The Futuristic and Classic look brought to the forefront of fashion by Matsuda Eyewear
To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the launch of Mitsuhiro Matsuda’s eyewear collection, they are reintroducing one the collection’s most coveted designs. This style embodies all of the design elements and unique details that catapulted Matsuda into the spotlight 25 years ago. As part of the Matsuda Heritage Collection, the 2809H has been updated with the option to wear the frame with either removable sideshields, or a removable spring brow bar. The polarized lenses are crafted from the highest quality mineral glass and are treated to provide full UV protection. A multilayer anti-reflective coating is applied to the back of each lens reducing unwated and distracting reflections.
With each 2809H taking over 122 hours of workmanship to create, they have released just 250 pieces of each color.
At Fine Eyewear, we are proud to have one of these rare and beautiful pieces in our office. Stop on in and pick up this collectors must have of eyewear history!

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Fine Eyewear and Eyecare offers the Matsuda eyewear collection in addition to many other fine collections of eyewear. Our eye doctors also provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities.  Visit our main website for a preview of Matsuda and read more about our eye wear collections : Fine Eyewear Collection

FINE EYEWEAR Ray-Ban Giveaway

Join us for our

FINE EYEWEAR

Ray Ban Giveaway!

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All you have to do is Like us on Facebook!

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When we reach 400 likes on our Facebook page, we will give away a pair of Ray Ban New Wayfarers to one lucky Facebook follower!

Take your pick of any New Wayfarer in our office, or have us order one in for you.

 

 

 

This contest will run until we receive 400 likes on our facebook page. There is no time limit for this contest. Once we receive 400 likes we will randomly draw a name from all people who like our Facebook page. Employees and direct family members of employees are exempt from winning. We will contact the winner through Facebook message to arrange a time to pick up their prize. The prize is a Rayban 2132 New Wayfarer style sunglasses, with non-polarized lenses. If prize winner would prefer a different style, they can upgrade for the difference in retail value.

A New Look For Michael Kors

Michael Kors has revamped their entire collection. Bringing a new combination of retro class with modern colors and designs. These new styles are sure to make anyone’s wardrobe pop with new fall colors and trends. Come on by to try out these beautiful new pieces. Visit our Pinterest and Website for all our new eyewear!

Michael Kors

Check Out or New Michael Kors!

 

Fine Eyewear and Eyecare offers an array of Fashion Eyewear including Michael Kors eyeglasses and sunglasses in addition to many other fine collections of eyewear and sunglasses . Our eye doctors also provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities.  Visit our main website for a preview and read more about our sunglasses collections : Fine Eyewear Collection

#MichaelKors #EyewearFashion

Steve Carell Floating with Some Maui Jim Sunglasses

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Steve Carell rose to fame after a five-year stint on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and then found greater fame playing Michael Scott on the American version of The Office. Clearly the man knows funny. He is now a bona fide movie star and his most recent film, The Way Way Back, about a shy 14-year-old who goes on summer vacation with his mother and her overbearing boyfriend, hit this past summer and will be released on DVD on Oct. 22. In the film, he and co-star, Toni Collette, both wear Maui Jim sunwear. Carell wears the Makaha sunglasses and Collette wears the Aloha Friday (not shown). Of course, anticipation is already running rampant for Carell’s next film, Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues, with Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd, scheduled for release on Dec. 20.
Fine Eyewear and Eyecare offers the Maui Jim sunglasses collection in addition to many other fine collections of sunglasses . Our eye doctors also provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities.  Visit our main website for a preview of Maui Jim and read more about our sunglasses collections : Fine Eyewear Sunglasses Collection
In recent years, many smartphone apps that are aimed at blind people have appeared.
In recent years, many smartphone apps that are aimed at blind people have appeared.

Luis Perez loves taking photographs. He shoots mostly on an iPhone, snapping gorgeous pictures of sunsets, vintage cars, old buildings and cute puppies. But when he arrives at a photo shoot, people are often startled when he pulls out a long white cane.

In addition to being a professional photographer, Mr. Perez is almost blind.

“With the iPhone I am able to use the same technology as everyone else, and having a product that doesn’t have a stigma that other technologies do has been really important to me,” said Mr. Perez, who is also an advocate for blind people and speaks regularly at conferences about the benefits of technology for people who cannot see. “Now, even if you’re blind, you can still take a photo.”

Smartphones and tablets, with their flat glass touch screens and nary a texture anywhere, may not seem like the best technological innovation for people who cannot see. But advocates for the blind say the devices could be the biggest assistive aid to come along since Braille was invented in the 1820s.

Counterintuitive? You bet. People with vision problems can use a smartphone’s voice commands to read or write. They can determine denominations of money using a camera app, figure out where they are using GPS and compass applications, and, like Mr. Perez, take photos.

Google’s latest releases of its Android operating systems have increased its assistive technologies, specifically with updates to TalkBack, a Google-made application that adds spoken, audible and vibration feedback to a smartphone. Windows phones also offer some voice commands, but they are fewer than either Google’s or Apple’s.

Among Apple’s features are ones that help people with vision problems take pictures. In assistive mode, for example, the phone can say how many heads are in a picture and where they are in the frame, so someone who is blind knows if the family photo she is about to take includes everyone.

All this has come as a delightful shock to most people with vision problems.

“We were sort of conditioned to believe that you can’t use a touch screen because you can’t see it,” said Dorrie Rush, the marketing director of accessible technology at Lighthouse International, a nonprofit vision education and rehabilitation center. “The belief was the tools for the visually impaired must have a tactile screen, which, it turns out, is completely untrue.”

Ms. Rush, who has a retinal disorder, said that before the smartphone, people who were visually impaired could use a flip-phone to make calls, but they could not read on the tiny two-inch screens. While the first version of the iPhone allowed people who were losing their vision to enlarge text, it wasn’t until 2009, when the company introduced accessibility features, that the device became a benefit to blind people.

While some companies might have altruistic goals in building products and services for people who have lost their sight, the number of people who need these products is growing.

About 10 million people in the United States are blind or partly blind, according to statistics

from the American Foundation for the Blind. And some estimates predict that over the next 30 years, as the vast baby boomer generation ages, the number of adults with vision impairments could double.

Apple’s assistive technologies also include VoiceOver, which the company says is the world’s first “gesture-based screen reader” and lets blind people interact with their devices using multitouch gestures on the screen. For example, if you slide a finger around the phone’s surface, the iPhone will read aloud the name of each application.

In a reading app, like one for a newspaper, swiping two fingers down the screen will prompt the phone to read the text aloud. Taking two fingers and holding them an inch apart, then turning them in a circle like opening a padlock calls a slew of menus, including ones with the ability to change VoiceOver’s rate of speech or language.

The iPhone also supports over 40 different Braille Bluetooth keyboards.

On all the mobile platforms, people with vision loss say, the real magic lies in the hundreds of apps that are designed specifically to help people who are blind.

There are apps that can help people see colors, so pointing their phones at an object will yield a detailed audio description of the color, like “pale yellow green” or “fresh apricot.” People who are blind say these apps open up an entirely new way of seeing the world. Light detection apps can emit a sound that intensifies when someone approaches a light source. This can be used to help people find a room’s exit, locate a window or turn off a light. There are apps that read aloud e-mails, the weather, stock prices as well as Twitter and Facebook feeds.

In the United States, one of the biggest challenges for blind people is figuring out a bill’s denomination. While coins are different sizes, there is no such differentiation between a $1 bill and a $100 bill. In the past, people with impairments had someone who could see help them fold notes differently to know which was which, or they carried an expensive third-party device, but now apps that use the camera can identify the denomination aloud.

“Before a smartphone was accessible we had to carry six different things, and now all of those things are in one of those devices,” Ms. Rush said. “A $150 money reader is now a $1.99 app.”

She added: “These devices are a game-changer. They have created the era of inclusion.”

While some app makers have made great efforts to build products that help people with impairments, other developers overlook the importance of creating assistive components.

Mr. Perez said what he could do now with his smartphone was inconceivable just a few years ago. But even well-known apps like Instagram, which he uses to share some of his photos, do not mark all of their features.

“When some developers design their apps, they don’t label all of their buttons and controls, so the screen reader just says, ‘This is a button,’ but it doesn’t say what the button actually does,” Mr. Perez said. “That’s an area where we need a lot of improvement.”

Fine Eyewear and Eyecare optometrists provides advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities. Stop by and check out our world class optical studio.  Our mission is to help you look and see your best!  More info can be found at www.FineEyewear.Net

THIN metal granny frames are out and cat eyes are in – the bigger, the better.

Gwen Stefani bumps her way to Sparrow Madden's Birthday Party - Part 2
Celebrities such as Gwen Stefani have helped make the cat eye look popular. Source: Splash News Source: Splash News Australia

Industry experts say fashion eyewear has moved towards chunky, plastic frames in bright colours – much like the look favoured by stars such as Gwen Stefani.

“When I first started out 14 years ago the majority of the time it was metal frames, but then over the years a lot of plastic frames have come into play,” Upper Mt Gravatt Specsavers manager Daniel Goodwin said.

“A big thing is the colours. There’s reds, there’s whites, there’s clear frames and they all come in different textures and styles.”

The wayfarer geek glasses made famous by Leonard in the hit TV show The Big Bang Theory were very in at the moment, he said.

Cat eye frames in different colours, styles and textures were also popular.

“Classic metal frames are still popular with the older generation, but the younger people want what they’re seeing on TV, more of a designer frame with more colours to it,” he said.

“They want it to compliment them. They see it as a fashion statement – these are my glasses and I’m making a statement with them.”

Fashion can be fickle, what’s old can be new again – and eyewear is no different.

“There’s been a lot of changes,” Sunnybank Specsavers director Peter Victorsen said.

“When I first started out the eye sizes were quite large. Then they had a distinct move away from that to a minimalist look where they’re quite small and now you can see a trend back to some of the larger styles again.

“Eyewear today is designed to be daring and bold, with strong colours and shapes.”

And it’s not just young hipsters who want to stand out, older people too are going for the bolder look.

“You do get the odd (older) person who wants something a little bit daring,” Mr Victorsen said. “It’s really across all age groups.”

While the trend appears to be moving away from the lighter and smaller look to a heavier look, the possibilities are extensive.

“It’s all dependent on you and what kind of look you want,” Mr Goodwin said.

Fine Eyewear and Eyecare offers an array of Fashion Eyewear including Chanel and Dita in addition to many other fine collections of eyewear and sunglasses . Our eye doctors also provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities.  Visit our main website for a preview and read more about our sunglasses collections : Fine Eyewear Collection

 

The focus for eyewear is on fashion

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Back in the day, that day being in the 1980s, Maureen “Mo” Canady’s saucer-sized prescription eyeglasses were the height of fashion – and an empty palette begging to be filled.
“I always had my name or initials out on them, and there were lots and lots of decorations to put on your lenses,” said Canady, who works part time at In-Sight Optical in Colorado Springs. “You could do engraving, like a butterfly with a little stone. That was the bling back then.”
The look of an era is often encapsulated in its spectacles, a medical device that in the 800 years since its anonymous invention has managed to become a ubiquitous fashion accessory even among the 20/20 set.
In the 1950s, thick horn-rimmed and cat-eye styles ruled, while the latter part of the ’60s saw a move toward circular, more delicately-framed models like those worn by John Lennon. Then came the headlight-sized lenses of the ’70s – favored by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis – and the ’80s, when trendy four-eyers liked to bedazzle their massive glasses.
Before the turn of the 20th century, though, the only statement you really made wearing a pair of spectacles was “I can’t see.”
“The first thing to really get your head around is that eyeglasses are not fashion,” said Jenny Benjamin, director of the Museum of Vision in San Francisco. “They were created for the old and infirm, which is unfortunately where their reputation got off on the wrong foot.”
In the 18th and 19th centuries, popular devices for vision correction such as scissor spectacles and lorgnettes weren’t designed to be worn on the face but held up to the eyes when sharper vision was necessary, then folded up and discreetly stowed.
“They were really meant to hide your need to use them,” Benjamin said. “You used them, then you put them away, hopefully far away, so nobody would really know you needed your eyeglasses at all.”
By the latter half of the 19th century, though, the lorgnette had evolved into such a popular fashion accessory that style arbiters complained in an 1870 book on etiquette:
“The functions of the natural eye and eyeglasses are much abused. It is quite clear that the whole world of fashion has not all of a sudden become so afflicted with short sightedness as to render the use of artificial means for its relief universally necessary.”
Those who needed full-time vision correction and could afford the cost might have engaged an artisan to craft a one-of-a-kind pair of temple frames into which corrective lenses could be set. With the Industrial Revolution and the growth of plastics manufacturing, the eyewear industry began to change. Molded plastic frames were cheap and easy to produce; suddenly, even the hoi polloi could afford to see well and look good doing it.
“That’s when fashion really started to come into play and spectacles stopped being just medical devices and, if not entirely fashionable, you could at least buy a pair that was nice looking,” Benjamin said.
In the early 20th century, popular styles included a tortoiseshell frame with large, round lenses favored by silent film actor and comedian Harold Lloyd, whose photos and movies ignited one of the nation’s first Hollywood celebrity-driven fashion crazes.
By the late 1950s, demand had risen in Europe and the U.S. for eyeglasses that could hold their own as part of a fashionable ensemble; the “designer eyeglass” industry was born, to provide new seasonal style tweaks in perpetuity.
“The glasses styles, they do a 10- to 15-year cycle and they start coming back again,” said Canady, who’s seen countless trends wax, wane and return in the two decades she’s worked at In-Sight Optical. “Now, a lot of people are wanting the John Lennon look again, but a little larger. The Zsa Zsa Gabor, that style’s coming back, too.”
When it comes to spotting future fashion trends, hindsight is often a good place for a designer to start.
 So, what’s hot in spectacles for fall 2013? An edgy new twist on the lorgnette, perhaps?
“For fall 2013, for women, there’s this trend we call ‘Tough Girl’ – classic feminine shapes but bolder, thicker, more in-your-face,” Lane said. “It’s almost kind of like creating a shield, but a shield that says look at me.”
Fine Eyewear and Eyecare offers an array of Fashion Eyewear including Chanel and Tiffany&Co.  in addition to many other fine collections of eyewear and sunglasses . Our eye doctors also provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities.  Visit our main website for a preview and read more about our sunglasses collections : Fine Eyewear Collection

Maui Jim Adds the Kolohe and Kawika Sunglasses

Kawika
Kawika

Maui Jim has debuted two new, tech-updated sunglasses, the Kolohe and Kawika. The styles are based on some of the first designs ever created by the company. Vintage details are what make both of these sunglasses trend-worthy thanks to the fine filigree-scrolled silver/nickel temples and nose bridges on thin, lightweight nylon frames. Both frames come with adjustable silicone nosepads and traditional hinges. Both frames feature MauiPure lenses, a non-glass lens that is ultra-lightweight, as well as scratch- and impact-resistant, with up to nine layers of glare-cutting, UV-eliminating and color-enhancing technology. The company’s patented PolarizedPlus2 lens technology and bi-gradient mirrors are also available and both styles are protected with waterproof and oleophobic coatings. MauiPure lenses are not available in prescription; however, the Kolohe frames can accommodate Maui Jim’s authentic prescription lens materials: Maui Evolution or polycarbonate. www.mauijim.com

Fine Eyewear and Eyecare offers the Maui Jim sunglasses collection in addition to many other fine collections of sunglasses . Our eye doctors also provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities.  Visit our main website for a preview of Maui Jim and read more about our sunglasses collections : Fine Eyewear Sunglasses Collection

Protecting Eyes From ‘Bad’ Blue Light

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The world can be a dangerous place, especially if viewed through the naked eye. Ocular hazards resulting from both natural and artificial light are everywhere.The threat posed by exposure to ultraviolet light is well known to eyecare professionals, and a growing number of consumers are becoming aware of it as well, thanks to advertising by sunglass companies and a new public awareness campaign that’s being undertaken by the Vision Council. The campaign’s message to consumers is simple and direct: Protect your eyes with sun lenses wear lenses that block UV rays up to 400 nanometers, or else you risk retinal damage and other serious eye injuries when you’re outdoors.Now a new ocular threat has emerged in the form of High Energy Visible (HEV) light. HEV is prevalent not just outdoors, but indoors as well. The indoor threat is posed largely by digital devices such as computer screens, tablets, smartphones and televisions, particularly the new flat screen models with OLED screens.

As with UV radiation, the damaging effects of HEV are cumulative over the course of a lifetime. Therefore, older people are more likely to show its effects. As Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM, and John Lahr, OD pointed out in a recent article in 20/20 Magazine about the impact of UV and HEV on the aging eye, “Newer research about the effects of HEV, in particular the wavelengths centered around 430 nm (±20 nm) also show that…blue light plays a role in the incidence and severity of AMD (age-related macular degeneration). In both cases, free radical damage to the cells of the retina by UV and HEV is suggested.

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“While the aging retina is more susceptible to this damage, the yellowing of the lens and the absorption of some of the blue might help reduce blue light exposure. However, oxidative damage of the retina continues to occur with aging and its own protective mechanisms become less effective with age. Fluorescent phototoxic chromophores accumulate in the retina; blue light reacts with them, stops the regenerative process and kills the cells that nourish the cones. The result is a graying, then total loss of central vision.”

Fine Eyewear and Eyecare offer many fine sunglasses options to protect against harmful blue light including Oakley and Maui Jim. Our eye doctors also provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock and surrounding communities.  Visit our main website for a preview of Oakley and Maui Jim and read more about our sunglasses collections : Fine Eyewear Sunglasses Collection