Category Archives: Eye Exam Information

Study finds, that regular eye exams saves on total health care costs

Rancho Cordova, CAApril 5, 2011 – VSP® Vision Care, an industry leader in the delivery of eyecare and eyewear, released the findings of a new study showing $4.5 billion in savings for its clients – for profits, not-for-profits and government organizations – through the early detection of chronic diseases via eyecare and vision exams covered by VSP vision insurance.

The study, conducted by Human Capital Management Services Group (HCMS), a national human capital consulting firm, found that for every $1 invested in VSP exam services – which include comprehensive, annual eye exams – during an employee’s first year with the benefit, employers can expect an average two-year total return of $1.27 in long-term healthcare savings. These savings are a result of avoided medical costs and increased employee productivity.
“With healthcare costs spiraling out of control, these new findings showing $4.5 billion in savings clearly demonstrate the importance of stand alone eyecare benefits,” said Rob Lynch, chief executive officer of VSP Global. “Preventive eye exams support overall wellness and are much more than a means to receive prescription eyewear.”
The HCMS study further revealed that VSP clients experienced 7 percent less absenteeism, 4 percent less employee turnover and savings on insurance and workers’ compensation costs. Early detection of chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension also increased the likelihood employees would be proactive with their healthcare and more likely to see a medical doctor to receive follow-up care.
“Individuals who have a VSP vision plan are three times more likely to get an annual eye exam than a routine preventive physical,” said Susan Egbert, director of eye health management, VSP Vision Care. “This means VSP providers are more likely to detect the first signs of common chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension.”
Cedar Park Eye Doctor

Fine Eyewear and Eyecare is a full service eye care facility.  Our eye doctors employ state of the art eye diagnostic equipment to provide you with advanced eye care with a personal touch. Our eye doctors provide advanced vision care to the families of Austin, Cedar Park, Leander, Georgetown, Round Rock, Lago Vista and surrounding communities. To read more about our eye care facilities : Eye Care in Cedar Park and surrounding communities

One In Four US Children May Have Vision Problems That Could Impair Learning, AOA Says

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (7/27, Sultan) reports, “One in four children in the US have undetected vision problems which could impair learning, according to the American Optometric Association.” Because “approximately 80 percent of learning comes through a child’s eye,” some experts believe that sending children “to school without good vision could be setting them up for failure or even cause them to be misdiagnosed with a learning disability.” Children who need eyeglasses or contact lenses should be examined annually or as recommended by their optometrist.”

Eyes Reflect Overall Health

A comprehensive eye exam looks at many facets of” both eye and overall health. The eyes “hold clues to other events in the body, and the condition of the body affects the eyes. This is important, because some conditions, particularly circulatory issues” and diabetes, may seriously affect vision and the eyes themselves. Often, early signs these diseases will first show up in the eyes. An annual comprehensive eye exam is one of the best early detection methods available. If you want to save money, save it by skipping a dining excursion out on the town, but don’t neglect your eye health.

Fine Eyewear & Eyecare is a full service eye care facility specializing in Glaucoma management and early detection of Glaucoma and other systemic problems. Our eye care facility is staffed by an eye doctor and we’re are near Avery Ranch in the 78717 zip code. We’re located in the Heb shopping center at Parmer and 1431.  You can find more information at www.FineEyewear.Net

Why Get an Eye Exam – I don’t need glasses ???

There is much talk today about nationalizing medical insurance, wellness care and of course maximizing the health care dollar. Eyecare plays a major role in preventive health care. Diagnosing systemic diseases as diabetes and hypertension, serious eye diseases that can cause blindness like glaucoma, and even enhanced school performance are all important reasons why eyecare needs to be a part of any major healthcare initiatives. Educating the public on the importance of this eyecare should be a major part of health awareness campaigns for all relevant institutions.”

New studies and estimates on the clear connection between eye exams and disease detection, workplace productivity and healthy lifestyles abound as the new Administration is pushing for reform overhauls. Just this month, a study by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of School of Public Health, the International Centre for Eyecare Education, the University of New South Wales and the African Vision Research Institute reported that corrected vision impairment could prevent billions of dollars in lost productivity annually. Worldwide, researchers estimate, nearly 158 million people globally suffer with vision impairment resulting from uncorrected refractive error, which can usually be eliminated with a pair of eyeglasses and an eye examination. The study is published in the June 2009 issue of the Bulletin of the World Health Organization.

importance of annual dilated eye examinations for people with diabetes

In a Health Watch column, the Gate House News Service (11/10) reported that of the approximately “23 million Americans” who “are affected by diabetes…almost six million are unaware that they have the disease.” If diabetes goes undiagnosed, it can “result in vision impairment…and blindness.” Patients with diabetes should consider having “a dilated eye examination on at least an annual basis,” or even “more often” if they have “existing eye issues or more serious retinopathy.” In the process of a thorough eye examination, an optometrist “will perform a variety of tests, including looking in [the] eyes with lights and lenses that magnify the view of the retina, to identify signs of diabetes and other eye-related health problems.”

Diseases that can be detected during eye exam

HealthDay (10/17, Preidt) reported that, according to a survey of “1,001 Americans age 18 and older” commissioned by the American Optometric Association (AOA), 26 percent of Americans “have not visited an eye doctor or eye-care specialist within the past two years,” suggesting that “many people aren’t paying enough attention to their eye health.” AOA expert James Kirchner, O.D., recommended “a comprehensive eye exam” for adults “at least every two years.” He emphasized that eye exams are “even more important for people who already use corrective lenses,” who might just “assume they just need a different lens prescription, when they really have a more serious problem. With eye diseases and disorders, as with most health issues, early detection and treatment are often the keys to avoiding permanent problems.” For example, the survey showed that 62 percent of respondents didn’t know that signs of diabetes may be detected by an eye doctor, while 71 percent didn’t know that a comprehensive eye exam can detect hypertension, brain tumors (75 percent), cancer (78 percent), cardiovascular disease (80 percent), and multiple sclerosis (90 percent).

American Eye-Q® Survey Indicates Strong Need To Educate Consumers About Eye Health

ST. LOUIS, MO, Oct. 9, 2008 –Too many Americans are not paying enough attention to their eyesight and overall eye health, according to a new survey by the American Optometric Association (AOA).

The AOA’s 2008 American Eye-Q® survey, which assesses public knowledge and understanding of a wide range of issues related to eye and visual health, showed that most Americans – 81 percent of respondents – wear contact lenses, eyeglasses or both. At the same time, however, 26 percent have not visited an eye doctor or eye care specialist within the past two years, as recommended by the AOA.

Since many eye and vision problems have no obvious signs or symptoms, people often are unaware that a problem exists. Early diagnosis and treatment of eye and vision problems are important to maintain good vision and eye health and, when possible, prevent vision loss.

“Every adult should have a comprehensive eye exam at least every two years, but it’s even more important for people who already use corrective lenses,” said Dr. James Kirchner, optometrist and AOA’s Eye Health Expert. “Too often we see people who have put off eye exams because they assume they just need a different lens prescription, when they really have a more serious problem. With eye diseases and disorders, as with most health issues, early detection and treatment are often the keys to avoiding permanent problems.”

Comprehensive eye exams are designed to:

Evaluate the functional status of the eyes, taking into account special vision demands and needs
Assess vision health and related systemic health conditions
Determine a diagnosis (or diagnoses)
Formulate a treatment and management plan
Counsel and educate patients about their visual, ocular and related systemic health care status, including recommendations for treatment, management and future care
Most Americans are unaware that comprehensive eye exams can detect more than just vision problems. Sixty-two percent didn’t know that signs of diabetes can be detected by an optometrist. Other diseases and conditions that respondents did not realize can be detected through a comprehensive eye exam include hypertension (not recognized by 71 percent), brain tumors (75 percent), cancer (78 percent), cardiovascular diseases (80 percent) and multiple sclerosis (90 percent).

Aging Eyes
Baby boomers need to pay particular attention to eye problems. The American Optometric Association recommends annual eye examinations for everyone over age 60.

It’s a fact of life that vision changes as you age, and baby boomers – Americans born between 1946 and 1964 – are at the stage when vision problems often begin. But these changes don’t have to compromise a person’s lifestyle.

According to the American Eye-Q® survey, 72 percent of respondents age 55 and older began experiencing changes in vision between the ages of 40 and 45. Their top concerns
about the effects of vision problems include not being able to live independently, cited by 48 percent; losing the ability to drive, 23 percent; and being unable to read, 21 percent.

Health problems in other parts of the body can affect vision as well. Individuals with diabetes or hypertension (high blood pressure), or people taking certain medications that have eye-related side effects, are at greater risk for developing vision problems.

Therefore, regular comprehensive eye exams are especially important later in life, when more people develop these types of chronic conditions and begin taking medications more frequently. Unfortunately, some people over 60 experience loss of sight beyond the normal, age-related vision changes. The good news is that more than half of survey respondents were aware of many of the risks of age-related eye diseases. The bad news is that the survey revealed limited understanding of the fact that without treatment, some eye diseases result in blindness. Macular degeneration, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy are among the age-related eye health conditions that can lead to permanent vision loss.

Rehabilitative services can give people with conditions such as low vision the assistance and resources needed to regain their independence and to help preserve remaining vision. A doctor of optometry can develop a rehabilitation program to help people with low vision live and work more effectively, efficiently and safely. Treatment options commonly include spectacle-mounted magnifiers, miniature hand-held or spectacle-mounted telescopes, and video magnification devices that enlarge reading materials on a video display monitor.

The American Eye-Q® survey revealed how respondents age 55 and older are addressing their age-related vision problems. More than half, or 60 percent, said they schedule frequent eye exams; 28 percent said they limit their night driving; 29 percent are increasing the nutrients necessary for healthy eyes; and 9 percent purchase books and other materials in large print.

Common Misconceptions and Other Findings
As in past Eye-Q® surveys, Americans continue to value their ability to see. Most respondents indicated that they worry about losing their vision (38 percent) more than their memory (31 percent), their ability to walk (14 percent) or their hair (8 percent).

Many respondents also held misconceptions about behaviors that can damage the eyes. For example, 71 percent incorrectly believe that reading under dim light can cause eye damage. Other misunderstandings about the causes of eye damage included sitting too close to the television, cited by 66 percent; and rubbing the eyes. While these behaviors can cause eye strain, they don’t cause physical damage to the eye or eye sight.

Nutrition is one promising means of protecting the eyes. However, respondents are unaware of what to eat to help their eyes. For example, only 2 percent of respondents correctly chose spinach as the best food for one’s eye health. Almost half, or 48 percent, believe the misconception that carrots are best for their eye health. Lutein and zeaxanthin, found in dark green leafy vegetables including spinach, help to protect against cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.
Fun Facts
Americans consider their eyes and eyesight important for reasons beyond health and vision. The survey indicated that 32 percent of respondents report they receive more compliments on their eyes than other features, and 42 percent said they consider color to be their eyes’ best attribute.

Source: http://www.aoa.org/x11023.xml

Optometrist points out importance of eye examinations for aging eyes.

In the Ask an Optometrist column in Canada’s Midland Free Press (9/17), Lillian Linton, O.D. pointed out that “common eye conditions affecting” aging “baby boomers can include glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration.” She reminded readers that the “only definitive way to diagnose your condition is to visit your optometrist to be tested.” Optometrists “use a number of techniques to assess any potential vision or eye health problems, and will keep a file of that information in order to keep track of changes in” future “eye health or vision.”

Regular eye exams may help detect early warning signs of disease.

The North American Press Syndicate (8/17) reported that “[r]egular eye exams are not just about obtaining optimal vision through the right eyeglass or contact prescription, but can also help detect early warning signs of disease that can affect your eye health and general health.” And, because “an eye examination can help detect many health problems, eye-care practitioners often work in conjunction with internists and general practitioners to help empower individuals on their health and wellness journey.” Many eye doctors now “offer new technology, such as digital retinal eye scans, that are quick and comfortable, and produce a computerized picture of blood vessels in action. This new technology effectively provides information on eye health and certain systemic health conditions, such as diabetes and glaucoma.” For good eye health, patients are urged to “[b]egin a regular routine of eye exams with an optometrist or ophthalmologist once a year, or as often as the doctor recommends.”

Regular eye exams may help detect early warning signs of disease.

The North American Press Syndicate (8/17) reported that “[r]egular eye exams are not just about obtaining optimal vision through the right eyeglass or contact prescription, but can also help detect early warning signs of disease that can affect your eye health and general health.” And, because “an eye examination can help detect many health problems, eye-care practitioners often work in conjunction with internists and general practitioners to help empower individuals on their health and wellness journey.” Many eye doctors now “offer new technology, such as digital retinal eye scans, that are quick and comfortable, and produce a computerized picture of blood vessels in action. This new technology effectively provides information on eye health and certain systemic health conditions, such as diabetes and glaucoma.” For good eye health, patients are urged to “[b]egin a regular routine of eye exams with an optometrist or ophthalmologist once a year, or as often as the doctor recommends.”